March 26, 2014

Beyond Bricks and Sticks





A weekly digest of current trends in housing and community development. The discussion examines topics from infrastructure to community fabric.

Homeownership Today and Tomorrow: Building Assets While Preserving Affordability

(RECAP: Permanently affordable homeownership through shared-equity programs is a more efficient use of public funds. But can low-income families build enough equity in them to transform their circumstances? New research says yes.)
http://www.nhi.org/research/2054/homeownership_today_and_tomorrow_building_assets_while_preserving_affordabi/

Could 'lean urbanism' jump-start urban revitalization projects?

(RECAP: At what point does necessary regulation become unnecessary red tape? New Urbanism architect and planner Andrés Duany hopes to find a way to help cut through the tape with the concept of “lean urbanism.” Last month he picked up a $600,000 grant from to explore the potential.)
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-lean-urbanism-urban-revitalization-20140317,0,5634799.story#axzz2wPLqIZqE

Managing Neighborhood Change

(RECAP: A strategic framework can help CDCs and other stakeholders foster sustainable and equitable neighborhood revitalization, building on solid market demand while ensuring that the community’s lower-income households will benefit from the neighborhood’s revitalization.)
http://www.nhi.org/research/521/managing_neighborhood_change/

Thousand dollar house, million dollar view

(RECAP: A college professor is attempting to trash some ideas about homeownership by sleeping in a six-by-six-foot dumpster for a year. The goal of the Dumpster Project is to prove we don't need to thousands of square feet to live in comfort.)
http://www.marketplace.org/topics/sustainability/education/thousand-dollar-house-million-dollar-view

Why urban history matters

(RECA: Height, density, use/control of land and public health in urban settings have evolved for a very long time. Going forward, let’s not discount the influence of history’s recurring themes in how we redevelop the urban realm.)
http://www.myurbanist.com/archives/10413

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